Raising the Mentoring Game

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Raising the mentoring game

Stops and starts have marked the very slow progress of mentoring in the UK. As the ultimate beneficiaries of mentoring, funders of new businesses should be leading the way.

The big question is (and was) why hasn’t mentoring taken off in the UK. Its best known successes include Richard Branson (said to have four mentors). the Princes Trust, and in Accelerators. Two levers were touted at the recent Annual Conference of the Association of Business Mentors (‘ABM’), both winners of the ABM’s Award for Commitment to Mentoring, but both embryonic.

Two initiatives

National Mentors Day’s third incarnation, masterminded by the redoubtable Chelsey Baker, will take place in October 2017, as a seriously bigger, more widespread, much more inclusive and hopefully more impactful day. And Janette Pallas, now at the University of Warwick Science Park, received this year’s award for her pioneering work in creating ecosystems of support in incubators and their ilk – a way forward being strongly encouraged in two recent regional meetings by the Scaleup Institute.

Non-progress

It is now several years (2011 to be precise) since the government made a commitment to put 10,000 mentors in place; and mentoring was a key part of the government’s Growth Builder programme, started in   2012, but alas for some strange reason withdrawn in 2016. Mentoring is an integral element of recent scaleup programmes, such as the Judge Institute’s and the RBS/UCL programme, but the mentoring scene is necessarily local and its institutions fragmented.

                                                   Funders should take the lead

It would be good to see funders take the initiative (eg VCs and Angel Funds) and along with innovation centres and development programmes (where mentoring is usually mandated) work in partnership with sources of mentors like the ABM (eg running joint workshops). The likes of the ABM could encourage mentoring by appointing ambassadors, and running more awards schemes or prizes. What is needed is a campaign of the extent of the Public Understanding of Science.

John Whatmore, March 2017

 

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A bespoke programme for private SMEs

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A bespoke growth programme for ambitious private companies.

ELITE is a platform of unique provenance designed to help the UK’s ‘most exciting and ambitious’ private companies prepare and structure for their next stage of growth.

Launched by the London Stock Exchange in 2014 and delivered in collaboration with Imperial College Business School, this programme – for the UK’s hi-growth private companies – is a veritable hothouse for growth.

Like other such programmes about which I have written recently, it is an extended programme of periodic meetings – this one an eighteen month, three part programme, consisting of education, discussion, business support, mentoring and access to entrepreneurs and business leaders as well as to the corporate advisory and investor community.

In the UK it comprises two cohorts a year, each of 15-20 companies (chosen for their growth potential) – the seventh cohort just starting; and involves seven modules of intensive meetings at the London Stock Exchange, each of one to one-and-a-half days, every eight weeks – normally for the CEO and the CFO.

The dominant theme is (not unexpectedly) capital. Other main themes are: strategy, talent and other key resources, governance, marketing, and packaging one’s story.

Get ready This section – of 8-days broken down into four modules, is aimed at providing participants with the operational skills –initially to review and reflect – about visibility, productivity and efficiency, and about cultural and organisational change.

In the Get Fit phase, all the suggestions and guidelines raised in the first phase are put into practice. Using a self-assessment test, the company can identify the areas for improvement to work on, and have the support of a group of professionals tailored to the specific needs of the company to consider how to embed changes in the business.

 Get value With the help of a select community of investors, professionals and companies, the participants will be engaged in initiatives for moving forward, such as exploring new funding options and new business opportunities – designed to boost the brand and ranking with investors, suppliers, customers and other stakeholders.

The ELITE programme was first implemented in Italy (where it also runs) in April 2012 and has now expanded all over Europe. Some 500 companies have participated in ELITE programmes across Europe, with an advisory and investor community of over 250.

John Whatmore, November 2016

 

How do other programmes compare?

All ‘scaleup’ programmes tend to be for small groups of senior executives in SMEs; they focus on key aspects of growth, and are structured for mutual discussions plus input from experts – at regular, usually monthly meetings over twelve months. (The following have all appeared recently on my website, http://www.johnwhatmore.com)

The Judge Institute’s SME Growth Challenge – a series of six bi-monthly workshops for CEOs of about a dozen hi-growth SMEs, delivered over 12 months – aims to develop each firm’s managerial capability.

The RBS/UCL Growth Builder programme is a 12-month programme for 48 growth companies to meet monthly, alternating between the provision of input and small group working, with meetings rotating around the premises of the numerous and various contributors.

10,000 Small Businesses is a programme offered by 5 UK universities for cohorts of c70 SMEs to develop growth plans. They meet together – in three separate session, each at a different location, with online learning between those sessions, and over the course of 30 days.

Plato, started in Belgium and now widely franchised throughout the world is for groups of c.15 senior executives from matched small companies – to meet regularly – each group with a couple of mentors from large companies – to support and help one another with their current issues.

Vistage, originating in the US, puts together groups, each of about a dozen senior executives in SMEs in the same local area, matched as far as possible. Meeting on each other’s premises, monthly or bi-monthly for a day at a time, they focus each time on the work of two or three members of the group.

‘ella forums’ is a leadership development programme designed to inspire growth in social enterprises, in which CEOs come together for monthly sessions, where they hear the latest thinking from guest speakers, share best practice, and receive coaching from experts.