Innovation Managers visit Maker Lab

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US Innovation Managers visit a brand new Maker Lab

While Maker Labs are becoming more common in the UK, they have not attracted the same interest as this group of innovation managers showed.

The Maker Lab movement has attracted interest alongside the startup frenzy as enabling entrepreneurs to make a model or prototype very quickly – so as to be able to show it off, and to prove that it works.

The US Association of Managers of Innovation (AMI), a by-invitation network of innovation practitioners – started in 1981, brings together managers who often have to work with leaders of enduring businesses when the latters’ primary interest is in their established components. It meets twice yearly in different locations in the US – for members to wrestle with their issues and exchange experience, and to use the opportunity to visit or learn about some topical aspect of innovation. The UK seriously lacks organisations and collaborations of this kind.

At this Autumn’s meeting for example, a visit will build on the theme of the Maker Movement. “We will be joined in Ann Arbor by Will Brick, General Manager of TechShop Detroit and we will visit the TechShop on Thursday late afternoon.
TechShop is a community-based workshop and prototyping studio on a mission to democratize access to the tools of innovation. The facility is packed with cutting-edge tools, equipment, and computers loaded with design software featuring the Autodesk Design Suite. Most importantly, TechShop offers space to make, and the support and camaraderie of a community of makers.
TechShop Detroit is a unique collaboration with Ford Global Technologies and occupies 38,000 square feet adjacent to Ford’s Dearborn Product Development campus.  Ford employees enjoy access to TechShop as a reward for contributing to Ford’s Employee Patent Incentive Award program.  At TechShop, Ford employees invent alongside members of the local community. Everyone has one thing in common, they are working to bring their ideas to life! …We will tour the facility and will share the story of how this unique collaboration with Ford began and the success they’ve had since opening their doors in 2012. Read more about TechShop in Forbes.”

Facebook has apparently just spent a considerable sum to open a brand new hardware lab of state-of-the-art machinery – to provide engineers from a wide variety of the company’s teams with a place to come together to share expertise, and work quickly on projects; and to save the time that would otherwise be necessary if third parties did the prototyping and testing work. Though people think of the company as a software company, says the article in Fast Company, its long-range plans are very much tied to hardware.

Richard Feynman, scientist and author, once opined of the US National Institutes of Health that any scientist who wanted to achieve a Nobel Prize should get apprenticed to an existing Laureate; and the same probably applies in Cambridge’s MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology – home to a series of Nobel Prize Winners. If incubators and their ilk are likely to harbour some of the best prospects among young businesses, it is surprising that since the demise of UK Business Incubator, the incubator association, there is no similar set-up (like the US Association of Managers of Innovation) under which the leaders of innovation communities can meet to learn together.

John Whatmore, October 2016.

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The latest twists in Accelerator programmes

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Support for startups and scaleups: the latest new twists

Six developments all designed to enhance interactions among and between the entrepreneurs in Accelerator programmes, their mentor community, VCs and relevant corporates.

FinTech in London could hardly be more topical or more relevant; and Startupbootcamp is among the most experienced of support programmes. So what is new in their latest programme? (For a description of a recent programme, see http://wp.me/p3beJt-8W)

  • They have invited one startup to be a startup-in-residence – to add to and benefit from the experience of being in the Accelerator.
  • They are running three, yes three, mentor matching days in the first four weeks of the twelve week programme. This acknowledges that match-making is a chancy business, and that as a new business evolves its needs for help evolve too.
  • They are running a social meeting for their mentor community, where an inspiring entrepreneur will share his/her story, which will also provide an opportunity for mentors to share their own experience.
  • They are holding a meeting well into the programme at which heads of innovation in this case from major financial institutions will debate how they can best work with startups – an opportunity for those present to exchange experience.
  • And they are holding regular weekly ‘Coffee Houses’ – expert gatherings for mentors to meet informally with startups to discuss their challenges in the week to come, each one focused progressively on a topic of the moment.
  • Finally, some incubators arrange a session at which a number of VCs can listen to pitches from emerging businesses so that they might keep in touch with those that interest them.

Chance meetings are well-recognised as among the best sources of support, and time is so vital to every young business that anything that can increase the chances of a good chance is valuable.

See also ‘Design you own Accelerators’ http://wp.me/p3beJt-K.

John Whatmore, October 2016.

Helping young businesses to create partnerships

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Helping young businesses to create partnerships

Finding a partner can provide a big step forward for a Scaleup, but in a disruptive world it is like looking you-know-not-where for you-know-not-what. Mediators are few and far between, but Nesta has shown a way forward; and Accenture has been a pioneer. Incubators and their ilk need a wide range of contacts on hand if they are to help with partnering.

For a young business with the potential for high growth, a ride on a partner can clearly generate a big step forward. A defining feature of SMEs is their lack of resources, says the recent Barclays ScaleUp Report: they need to leverage external resources, for example by alliances with established companies – which can:

  • help you develop your product
  • introduce you to markets
  • support you with funds and funding, and
  • enhance the value of your business.

Unilever’s European Open Innovation Manager’s search for new supply chains for example, starts with entrepreneurs and IP, for which he then looks for development grants, and partners – like Siemens, Akzo Nobel, Croda or Syngenta, who will adopt and use the new technology in order to deliver product to Unilever.

Nesta, some time ago in an open innovation pilot, acted as intermediary for P&G by eliciting and selecting relevant ideas and then providing a period of support and development with the help of a VC and enabling the best to be pitched to P&G, one of which looked like a winner – a process of building up communication channels and developing trust, now run regularly by its creaters ‘100% Open’.

Nesta’s recent ‘Scaling Together’ Report (March 2016) contains 37 ‘tips for corporates’ on how to develop relationships with such young businesses, but not a single one for the latter – on how to find and work with a corporate. Except perhaps the briefest of stories about the good luck Bill Clee of Asset Mapping had when his endless networking efforts eventually led to his being offered a place by Cisco in incubator IdeaLondon.

The current tide of disruption suggests that potential partners are increasingly likely to be found in surprising places; and, unsurprisingly, intermediaries have played a part in recent examples – such as:

*         Accenture’s Fintech Labs at Level39 (http://wp.me/p3beJt-3), where 8 to 10 young businesses are invited from all over the world to participate in an Accelerator development programme, sponsored by a dozen major banks, each of which provides a chaperone to introduce them to key individuals in their bank.

*         Accenture’s latest version of the Accelerator Lab, (millenial20-20.com) launched with a razzmattaz of a major conference on the future of retailing, complete with a store of the future, where some eight innovative businesses were selected for eight weeks together at The Trampery co-working space in Shoreditch; and the dozen major retailers (Argos, Sainsbury’s, Kingfisher, Specsavers, Dixons/Carphone – among others) were invited to presentations and discussions with them over the period of their residency.

For Accenture these were experiments in creating processes that would support major changes in sectors, whether disruptions or major challenges.

Often a mentor with wide experience and a big address book is a valuable mediator (one mentor was able to suggest ten possible customers for the technology of a business he was mentoring!)

These stories highlight the importance for incubators of having well oiled contacts with corporates that are on the look-out for entrepreneurs and IP, where partnerships might generate highly productive alliances for growth.

Dreamstake (http://wp.me/p3beJt-6H), online home to more than 15,000 young businesses of which 2,000 are technology based, now offers access to 50 VCs, 800 technology angel investors and to top influencers in the London technology scene as well as to successful founders in Silicon Valley – through its DreamLab Ventures initiative. But most incubators offer little more than office or desk space.

John Whatmore, October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

The latest support programmes for SMEs

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Support programmes for young ventures in incubators

New support programmes for scaleups are of a design that could easily be replicated in incubators and their ilk, and could help generate big steps in growth.

Incubators have been essentially providers of low cost accommodation for small businesses, but they are coming under pressure to be more active in the support of their growth and development.

The concept of the Accelerator has illustrated what can be achieved by orchestrated forms of support – at least for startups. And the recent Barclays report has suggested that some of those approaches might also be usefully applied to Scaleups, with the aim of nurturing some great businesses of the future.

New programmes for Scaleups (such as the Judge Institute’s Growth Builder programme (http://wp.me/p3beJt-fn) and the RBS/UCL Business Growth programme (http://wp.me/p3beJt-dK) have taken the form of periodic meetings for CEOs, usually monthly meetings over twelve months, and consisting of mutual discussions of their problems and opportunities, and learnings about the latest developments in the most relevant topics, such as the latest uses of social media and the latest sources of finance. The Belgian Plato programme (http://wp.me/p3beJt-dH) (widely franchised in other countries) and the Vistage programme from the US (http://wp.me/p3beJt-cb) now popular in the UK – both for cohorts of senior executives, both use a very similar format.

What is common to these programmes is:

*         the exchanging of experience

*         their regular but occasional meetings

*         their intimacy and confidentiality

*         their ability to bring together individuals with common issues or experience.

And surprisingly, their addictiveness.

Their participants are usually carefully matched – for sector, technology, markets, size or maturity.

Young businesses with high growth potential will often be found in incubators, co-working spaces and innovation centres, where it would not be difficult to set in motion programmes of this kind, which could give a major boost to their participants.

John Whatmore, October, 2016

New support for startups and scaleups in East London

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New support for startups and scaleups in East London
ENTIQ’s new innovation centre in the old Olympic Park will be a great new signpost but the peloton needs more than that: a new network is needed to spur incubators and co-working spaces to develop support services like this one –  for the growing number of young businesses.

ENTIQ is the innovation consultancy behind a new Innovation Centre on the new campus in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in East London. Jointly owned with an investment fund, it will provide support services for business development for: new product development – with prototyping facilities and a technology lab, entrepreneurship and business education, business-accelerator and -growth programmes, and back office and professional support.

                                                          Focus on local threads 

The Innovation Centre’s aim is to establish a cluster of up to 500 members and organisations as at Tech City in Shoreditch; and the Centre will work with companies big and small that are pioneering new technology in their fields, with an initial focus on Sport, Health, Fashion, Smart Cities and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Typical targets include improving engagement in sport; tools for preventative healthcare; designing intelligent and functional fabrics; applications that improve connectivity; and sustainability and mobility in urban environments.

                                                 This will be a gee-whizz park

It is expected to be a place for experimentation, design and performance – for entrepreneurs and big businesses alike – a launchpad for British-based scale-ups and a ‘soft landing pad’ for companies coming to the UK for the first time.

With its base in London, it could make a much needed contribution to the development and commercialisation of UK technology. It will be a centre that is carefully tailored to early-stage businesses and in particular to those that are pioneering new technologies, and one that also has on hand high quality support, provided proactively.

                                      Scaleups badly need this kind of leadership

While the number of incubators and particularly co-working spaces in the UK has been growing substantially (there are probably now several thousand), few offer services to their occupants to this extent, yet they are possibly housing the unicorns of the future.

Many of these are run by individuals who have little hands-on experience of business or of business support agencies; and their links with the business community are often tenuous. ENTIQ however, was co-founded by two people who co-created Level39 – the innovation centre in Canary Wharf; and ran the Cognicity Programme for Canary Wharf Group, a 3D Fintech Lab for Dassault Systemes, and a Blockchain Lab project among other specialist innovation programmes. Claire Cockerton is a serial entrepreneur, and Eric van der Kleij had been the founding CEO of TechCity.

                                                        A very tough task

Making a success for early-stage businesses in all sorts of developing technologies in a Centre like this could well be as difficult a task as if all the students in a university were reading completely different subjects. It will require a remarkably sophisticated feat of collaborative support – to help all of the different businesses to develop and commercialise their products or services. Or else it may have a high failure rate.

With the rise in entrepreneurialism, support for startups and scaleups has got more sophisticated as Accelerators have proliferated and diversified; and Growth Builder programmes have come on the scene. With new developments in support evolving continually, there is an urgent need to help incubators and co-working spaces UK-wide to be able to offer them to their occupants.

UKBI (UK Business Incubator – the sector’s trade association) was founded some twenty years, but collapsed several years ago. The time is surely right for a new network of hothouses (incubators, co-working spaces and their ilk), that will help its members learn from one another and from outside experts about the latest practices and approaches for providing support to young businesses.

*                               *                             *

Some comparable initiatives
This will be a larger project than the Daresbury Innovation Centre (http://wp.me/p3beJt-Y), launched several years ago in the vacuum left when the bid for the new Synchrotron facility went to Harwell; Daresbury has a wider range of businesses on its campus, but without as much support; similar too to Harwell (http://wp.me/p3beJt-r), which has a large number of businesses on its site – many related to the technology of its Synchrotron, where good technical support is at least on hand; but there is scant business support; and not unlike Rocket, a Berlin funder and supporter of early stage businesses (http://wp.me/p3beJt-8U), or the newly opened Edney Innovation Centre in Chattanooga, seen by its civic leaders as ‘the gateway to the city’s command-ing new business enterprise’ (New York Times.)

See also: Design your own Accelerators: an analytical review for innovationeers – johnwhatmore.com 8 Dec 2014 http://wp.me/p3beJt-K

John Whatmore
September 2016

Wharton on ‘Whither Accelerators’

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Accelerators: Wharton on emerging avenues

While the established Accelerators evolve, the field grows and segments: some are now corporate based, some property based, some employment based, some area based, some sector based, some market based; all of them chipping away at Silicon Valley’s market share.

 “Accelerators are a very expensive source of capital,” “If you’ve never launched your own startup before it’s great validation, and maybe you need that leg up. If you need a stronger network and you definitely need advisers – those are the key things accelerators provide you that is worth that 7%.” However, “If you’re a vetted entrepreneur or you’ve been at Google as an engineer and you’ve been at a fast-moving pace, an accelerator might even be a negative signal for a venture capitalist knowing that you’ve already committed 7%,”

What is it that is of value and to whom? Is it the interview process, the validation created by being selected, the mentoring, your fellow startups, the pitching process, the investment – or what?

Incubators Grow Up

Incubators provide space and resources for collections of young businesses, together with occasional mentorship. Accelerators are intensive development programmes for cohorts of around a dozen young ventures, working in close company, for around 12 weeks, with intimate help from mentors and advisers, in return for 6-10% of equity – with the objective of enabling them to raise seed capital from investors.

About half raise capital – good odds considering about one in 100 startups overall get funded, according to George Deeb, managing partner of Red Rocket of Chicago.

“The best programs have a substantial impact,” says Dave McClure, the founder of Silicon Valley accelerator 500 Startups. “The worst programs can probably cause damage.”

Techstars – an evolving archetype

Over nine years, Techstars has become one of the world’s leading accelerators, with programs in Berlin, London, New York, Cape Town in South Africa, and Tel Aviv, among other locations.

Those who enter the program give up 6% of common stock for the loan. They also receive lifetime access to Techstars’ resources, hands-on mentorship in a three-month program with office space, $20,000 in living expenses and connections to more than 5,000 experts.

Techstars reportedly now automatically offers a $100,000 convertible note to all startups upon acceptance. The note converts at a pre-money valuation [the valuation before outside funds or the latest rounds of funding are accounted for] of $3 million to $5 million, the company says.

In 2015, Techstars initiated an equity back guarantee program to address the shifting paradigm. With the preponderance of competing accelerators and other avenues to reach investors, Techstars officials now offer their startups a chance to lower or eliminate how much equity they give up. Startups have three business days after the program ends to reject the standard plan if they aren’t satisfied with what Techstars offers.

Deeb, a founding Techstars mentor, is a staunch proponent of the model that vets startups before investors hear about them. Techstars Chicago picks 10 companies out of 1,000 applicants, says Deeb. This way investors hear pitches from only the most promising startups as determined by the accelerator.

Corporates too are into startups

Another tentacle in the ecosystem can be found in Techstars’ collaboration with major corporations. Since 2015, Techstars had partnered with such heavyweights as Barclays, Disney and Sprint to create accelerator programs for each company.

Disney did not renew its contract with Techstars in early 2016 but continues to operate a startup accelerator. Kevin Mayer, Disney’s executive vice president of corporate development, has said the company isn’t investing in startups in order to make a quick profit like a typical venture capitalist…it is more interested in creating cutting-edge products it can use, as well as revitalizing its leadership by staying at the forefront of innovation.

Corporate leaders figure they can train and support aspiring entrepreneurs to be part of innovative projects in-house instead of having to pay millions later on to acquire them. “Opening an accelerator is a strategic decision that allows big corporates to stay relevant and competitive in a rapidly changing economy,” Microsoft’s general manager of accelerators Zack Weisfeld wrote this year in an opinion piece for Forbes.

 Incentives and objectives are of various kinds

Charles Bonello, a New York entrepreneur, investor and startup tinkerer, is co-founder and managing director of Grand Central Tech, a New York City startup hub that offers companies a year long program without charging rent or taking equity. The catch is that companies that complete the program agree to rent office space for four years in the accelerator’s extensive 1.1-million square foot building overlooking Grand Central Station, a building owned by the accelerator’s billionaire backers.

Many of the startups entering Grand Central Tech aren’t looking for seed money. They are attracted to the program’s impressive list of corporate partners that include Google, IBM, L’Oreal USA, Microsoft, Pepsico North America and JPMorgan Chase.

 Bonello and partner Matt Harrigan have a long-term goal of finding emerging companies trying to solve problems. “Our goal is to create a single point of density of the best technology companies in New York.” One of their first startups was Nagare Membranes, a developer of water filtration technology. By keeping like-minded entrepreneurs in the same office the men hope for cross-pollination in problem solving.

Employment as another objective of accelerators

“Looking at emerging markets, many see entrepreneurship as solving unemployment issues,” says one Wharton expert; but many don’t. “And many jobs are outsourced to other countries like India for IT.” Community and political leaders have many motivations for accelerating business in their region, but “it’s not clear it is working”, even though the Obama Administration’s Startup America Initiative has used many of the fundamental accelerator ideas to promote small businesses nationally.

In 2011, the Chilean government decided the best way to promote homegrown entrepreneurship was to create its own accelerator. The country’s economic development agency hatched the idea with Stanford University experts to create Start-Up Chile. Government officials offered entrepreneurs from around the world $40,000 of equity-free capital, infrastructure and work visas for one year to develop their companies over six months. The program also gave selected startups access to Chile’s financial network. The idea was that the recruited entrepreneurs would serve as role models for Chile’s budding startup culture, but it is uncertain how many stayed in Chile.

Muhammed Mekki, a founding partner of AstroLabs, has extended a corporate connection to Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. It has strong government backing for its partnership with Google to build a startup hub and training academy to promote online and mobile business throughout the Arab world.

“It becomes part of the culture, and when it becomes part of the culture, it becomes part of the government – to integrate this idea of startup mentality,” says Bambi Francisco, whose company Vator is one of the largest social network platforms dedicated to entrepreneurs.

Specialisation

The first accelerators recruited all types of companies instead of focusing on specific industries. But as these programmes proliferated they became more nuanced in targeting companies to accelerate.

Blue Builder is an accelerator in southwest France that caters to ocean and other outdoor sports in the picturesque fishing village of Saint-Jean-de-Luz, located in the heart of the surf alley in the Basque country. It also lies beneath the Pyrenees Mountains, providing a testing ground for all kinds of adventure sports products.

It offers a campus with prototype studios, workshops and a safe environment to experiment with materials such as polymers and resins used for building surfboards and snowboards, where those involved can maintain their lifestyle, and which is close to its market rather than close to coders or to sources of finance.

It works with entrepreneurs on specific projects to get them launched when they are ready to be presented to investors. It surrounds these creative trailblazers with brand designers, user experience designers, business developers and finance and legal experts to increase the likelihood of success during a year long assignment to build a product, such as one involving a sensor that measures surfboard movements in real time.

Moreover, it determines how much equity it gets based on the valuation of each company instead of taking a uniform percentage at the entry point.

Instead of looking for companies, Entrepreneur First in the UK recruits graduates, and then partners with the talent to build a company from scratch. This is one way to attract a variety of experts to work on a specific issue.

 Hybrid Approaches

The University of Pennsylvania is pioneering a new approach to entrepreneurship by combining academic applications with practical experience. Some argue that college is the best time to launch a business because of the proximity to so many people to test the product and gather feedback.

Penn’s Graduate School of Education (GSE) has created the country’s first executive master’s degree programme in education entrepreneurship. The school also helped create an Education Design Studio, a hybrid incubator and seed fund for education startups. Entrepreneurs who chose the incubator route have access to GSE’s professors to get the latest research on what is working in their areas of interest. But they do not earn degrees.

The model of offering two routes to launching businesses with academic support — in school while pursuing a master’s degree part-time or through an incubator program — is not limited to education startups.

A short form process

Started in 2007, Vator holds entrepreneur conferences in Los Angeles, London and Oakland, California, that can lead to investment deals. It has promoted about 175 companies through its startup competitions in the past five years. The winners get to pitch to investors at the end of their Splash events just like they would at an accelerator “demo-day.” Its startups have raised $700 million in capital without releasing any equity to the facilitator.

The future of the Valley

“People say nobody’s going to duplicate Silicon Valley. In many ways, it is part of the natural evolution that turned the San Francisco Bay Area into a global economic powerhouse with Apple, Facebook, Google and Twitter among the current stars.” “It has gotten easier in other places, but there is no doubt by every stat that it is the hub of entrepreneurial activity, especially in the web software services space. The big brands keep the Bay Area at the heart of American innovation. But the environment has changed.”

The mean distance between a venture capitalist and a company they invest in, says one old hand, is only 80 miles. “So, if you’re not in San Francisco or New York or a few other places, you’re unlikely to get access to funding.” He is sceptical of some accelerators that advertise a new approach with more access. Yet “There are reasons to have accelerators in cities Europe-wide because these people are cut off from the funding system and support system that exists for the lucky few in the U.S. But you can’t just copy Y Combinator and expect it to work.”

With investors more dispersed these days, entrepreneurs can create companies closer to their homes, which, in turn, can lead to organically grown startup communities that include accelerator programmess and localised funding – the type of industry plays a big role in where a community develops. McClure says it requires the “minimum critical mass” of startups and investment in entrepreneurs to develop a thriving hub. As many as 100 metropolitan areas worldwide have the potential to reach that threshold.

See: http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/why-startup-accelerators-are-feeling-pressure-to-evolve/ July 2016

John Whatmore, September 2016

 

A new Accelerator Lab by Accenture

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A revolutionised Accelerator Lab Helping corporates to work with innovative young companies to introduce innovations in the fast-changing retail field.

Nesta’s work with P&G in 2010, where Nesta acted as the confidential intermediary for half-a-dozen startups, was a door-opener into the field of Open Innovation.

The latest such opening is a dramatic evolution of Accenture’s Fintech Lab Accelerator, where a dozen banks each provided a chaperone whose role was to help the half-a-dozen young ventures that had been brought together at Level39, to introduce their products to the relevant managers in these banks.

Where the banks faced major threats arising from new ways in which financial transactions could be made, the retail trade and brands are fighting a rearguard action to counter Amazon’s lead in online retailing; and they are doing this by majoring on

  • individualisation,
  • sophistication and
  • personalisation

In Accenture’s latest version of the Accelerator Lab, launched with a razzmattaz of a major conference on the future of retailing, complete with a store of the future, innovative businesses had been invited to enter a competition, whose winners and runners-up were then offered eight weeks together at The Trampery co-working space in Shoreditch; and the dozen major retailers (Argos, Sainsbury’s, Kingfisher, Specsavers, Dixons/Carphone – among others) who participated in the programme were invited to presentations and discussions with them over the period of their residency.

Millenial 2020 (millenial20-20.com)is a process created by Accenture for corporates in retail. It kicked off with a two-day conference – a grand gathering of over 3,000 startups, brands, retailers, and corporates encompassing four industry sectors, at which Accenture set up a store of the future, entitled The World of ME: Millenial Expectations: an inspiration playground for the consumer experience and store playground of the near future’, ‘an immersive experience that brings together a curated selection of start-ups and brands to explore millennial-driven products and services expected to influence the retail and consumer landscape of the near future.

 Will the store no longer be solely a place to purchase things, but a port of call for expertise, unique brand stories, immersive experiences and even a place to learn, create products and connect with like-minded individuals?

Accenture had invited companies to pitch their ideas for innovation to judges from the twelve participating organisations for the Accenture Consumer Innovation Awards. 170 applied and sixteen were invited to pitch – in four categories:

  • Get me into the store and spending more
  • Get me what I want and when and where I want it
  • Make ME digital on the inside, and
  • Give ME omni-personalisation

 “Ignite your senses Using all five senses, play with products and innovations curated to illuminate future scenarios we see emerging. For example…

– Experience what on-demand personalisation could mean for jewellery by trying on and designing 3D printed pieces from WonderLuk.

– For the Conscious ME millennial, brand values that align with beliefs and identity will become a given. Touch and feel a textile made from citrus peel, brought to you by Orange Fiber, one of 5 winners of the H&M Conscious Foundation’s Global Change Award.

– Experiences will start to become the product. Swipe left or right to determine your preferences and find the right food pairing to match the craft beer you select, all powered by Accenture Customer Genome and Intel.

For Accenture this was an experiment in creating processes that would support major changes in sectors – disruptions or major challenges; and so both enhance and demonstrate to potential customers their armoury of processes in the consultancy business. It is being repeated later in the year in New York and in Singapore.

Corporates, including Barclays, John Lewis, Tesco, and most notably Telefonica, have gone down the path of running their own Accelerators despite disadvantages to the startups involved. In participating in group Accelerators, including in the insurance industry, the food industry, the healthcare industry and the New Cities initiative, startups have accepted the risks that openness involved.

More an opportunity for corporates and early-stage businesses to get thoroughly acquainted than to get engaged, Accenture’s innovative new ‘immersive’ process has played on their willingness to be open and transparent. Only time will tell whether it has facilitated the development of innovations into new products or services.

John Whatmore, July 2016