Top ‘innovationeerings in 2016

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 Top ‘innovationeerings in 2016

 Five approaches in which identifying big issues is the carrot that leads the innovation process Focusing on major issues rather than relying on people with good ideas is likely to be a good source for the 6% of businesses with hi-growth potential (- and Unicorns) March 2016. http://wp.me/p3beJt-dU

 Support for startups and scaleups: the latest Six developments all designed to enhance interactions among and between the entrepreneurs in Accelerator programmes, their mentor community, VCs and relevant corporates. October 2016. http://wp.me/p3bejt-gJ

A Growth Builder programme for hi-growth ventures At last programmes are being initiated, based on the elements of the Accelerator but provided on a periodic basis, that fill a gap in aiming to help hi-growth businesses to grow faster. March 2016. http://wp.me/p3beJt-dK

 Support programmes for young ventures in incubators New support programmes for scaleups are of a design that could easily be replicated in incubators and their ilk, and could help generate big steps in growth. October 2016. http://wp.me/p3beJt-gB

 A revolutionised Accelerator Lab Helping corporates to work with innovative young companies to introduce innovations in the fast-changing retail field. July 2016. http://wp.me/p3beJt-fF

 A lab head and product developer She encouraged her students to tackle issues that could have commercial appeal as much as scientific value, and helped them to realise their commercial capabilities as well as produce great science. (Science 12 June 2015) Feb 2016. http://wp.me/p3beJt-dw

 Science has too few ‘hustlers’ Why do we have so few entrepreneurs to help bring the products of our scientific expertise into widespread use? Do places like Harwell and Daresbury do enough to identify and encourage hustlers like some of those about whom I have written. December 2016. http://wp.me/p3beJt-i1

John Whatmore, December 2016

UK science has too few ‘hustlers’

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Science has too few ‘hustlers’ Why do we have so few entrepreneurs to help bring the products of our scientific expertise into widespread use? Do places like Harwell and Daresbury do enough to identify and encourage hustlers like some of those about whom I have written (see blelow).        Next week: Synthetic Biology at Imperial helps to launch startup ‘LabGenius’.

 A promoter of collaborations to tackle serious issues Ian Downey at the European Space Agency (ESA) puts consortia together for innovative projects enabled by Satellite technology. To combat the recent sharp rise in Lyme’s Disease he had brought together researchers into malaria in Africa and in the UK, GPs and hospitals in Scotland, and pharmaceutical companies – in a project funded by the ESA at Harwell.

A lab head and product developer At MIT she encouraged her students to tackle issues that could have commercial appeal as much as scientific value, and helped them to realise their commercial capabilities as well as produce great science; and went on in the same style to found her own lab in the far east, whence came lots more startups. (Science 12 June 2015) http://wp.me/p3beJt-dw

 Rolling out innovations: the Space Catapult Subverting concerns that in the UK we fail to exploit our technical leads, the Space Catapult is charting new applications for satellites and facilitating path-finding initiatives in technology, markets and finance. June 2015 (http://wp.me/p3beJt-bb)

 Advancing the development of synthetic biology  SynbiCITE (http://wp.me/p3beJt-e8) is an ‘Innovation and Knowledge Centre’ several of which were established in the last few years to develop emerging technologies that have the potential to become major industries. Synthetic Biology – creating manufacturable agents by digitally engineering their biology – is in its very early stages: the Centre is still in the process of identifying commercialisable challenges (such as in chemicals, advanced materials, energy, health and environmental protection.) But even in these very early stages, it has already managed to spawn several startups, of which LabGenius is one – a business which is selling DNA to biotech and pharma for drug development (see next week.)

Steve Blank’s I-Corps Biotech Boot Camp Hallowed publication ‘Nature’ reported on a nine-week ‘Biotech Boot Camp’ in the US, funded by the National Institutes of Health, which aims to get entrepreneurial scientists to get out there and ask potential customers what they want. http://wp.me/p3beJt-av

John Whatmore, December 2016

 

A bespoke programme for private SMEs

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A bespoke growth programme for ambitious private companies.

ELITE is a platform of unique provenance designed to help the UK’s ‘most exciting and ambitious’ private companies prepare and structure for their next stage of growth.

Launched by the London Stock Exchange in 2014 and delivered in collaboration with Imperial College Business School, this programme – for the UK’s hi-growth private companies – is a veritable hothouse for growth.

Like other such programmes about which I have written recently, it is an extended programme of periodic meetings – this one an eighteen month, three part programme, consisting of education, discussion, business support, mentoring and access to entrepreneurs and business leaders as well as to the corporate advisory and investor community.

In the UK it comprises two cohorts a year, each of 15-20 companies (chosen for their growth potential) – the seventh cohort just starting; and involves seven modules of intensive meetings at the London Stock Exchange, each of one to one-and-a-half days, every eight weeks – normally for the CEO and the CFO.

The dominant theme is (not unexpectedly) capital. Other main themes are: strategy, talent and other key resources, governance, marketing, and packaging one’s story.

Get ready This section – of 8-days broken down into four modules, is aimed at providing participants with the operational skills –initially to review and reflect – about visibility, productivity and efficiency, and about cultural and organisational change.

In the Get Fit phase, all the suggestions and guidelines raised in the first phase are put into practice. Using a self-assessment test, the company can identify the areas for improvement to work on, and have the support of a group of professionals tailored to the specific needs of the company to consider how to embed changes in the business.

 Get value With the help of a select community of investors, professionals and companies, the participants will be engaged in initiatives for moving forward, such as exploring new funding options and new business opportunities – designed to boost the brand and ranking with investors, suppliers, customers and other stakeholders.

The ELITE programme was first implemented in Italy (where it also runs) in April 2012 and has now expanded all over Europe. Some 500 companies have participated in ELITE programmes across Europe, with an advisory and investor community of over 250.

John Whatmore, November 2016

 

How do other programmes compare?

All ‘scaleup’ programmes tend to be for small groups of senior executives in SMEs; they focus on key aspects of growth, and are structured for mutual discussions plus input from experts – at regular, usually monthly meetings over twelve months. (The following have all appeared recently on my website, http://www.johnwhatmore.com)

The Judge Institute’s SME Growth Challenge – a series of six bi-monthly workshops for CEOs of about a dozen hi-growth SMEs, delivered over 12 months – aims to develop each firm’s managerial capability.

The RBS/UCL Growth Builder programme is a 12-month programme for 48 growth companies to meet monthly, alternating between the provision of input and small group working, with meetings rotating around the premises of the numerous and various contributors.

10,000 Small Businesses is a programme offered by 5 UK universities for cohorts of c70 SMEs to develop growth plans. They meet together – in three separate session, each at a different location, with online learning between those sessions, and over the course of 30 days.

Plato, started in Belgium and now widely franchised throughout the world is for groups of c.15 senior executives from matched small companies – to meet regularly – each group with a couple of mentors from large companies – to support and help one another with their current issues.

Vistage, originating in the US, puts together groups, each of about a dozen senior executives in SMEs in the same local area, matched as far as possible. Meeting on each other’s premises, monthly or bi-monthly for a day at a time, they focus each time on the work of two or three members of the group.

‘ella forums’ is a leadership development programme designed to inspire growth in social enterprises, in which CEOs come together for monthly sessions, where they hear the latest thinking from guest speakers, share best practice, and receive coaching from experts.